Hemp Tea & CBD: What You Need To Know

CBD TEA: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

CBD oils and edibles take up much of the spotlight in the world of CBD products. However, a new star is beginning to rise: CBD drinks. Everything seems to be available with a CBD infusion, whether it’s water, a refreshing lemonade or a fancy mocktail. While the idea seems novel, it has actually been around for centuries. The humble hemp tea has long been enjoyed across many cultures and has also been considered a remedy for various ailments, including stress, restlessness and insomnia. But what is CBD tea and how is it prepared? Here’s what you need to know.

WHAT IS HEMP TEA?

Classic tea is a drink brewed from tea leaves originating from Asia. Both green and black tea come from the same plant, and the treatment of the tea leaves after harvesting influences the effects and flavour of the drink. Hemp tea, on the other hand, is a herbal infusion that doesn’t contain any components from the tea plant. Instead, like mint or chamomile tea, dry, shredded or milled parts of the plant are steeped in hot water. This extracts flavours, colour and beneficial components for a hot, delicious cup of goodness.

Hemp tea has a greenish colour and herbal aroma caused by the terpenes that naturally occur in the plant. It is essential to point out that there are different types of hemp teas. Some are produced from the seedless flowers of the plant, which are higher in cannabinoids and terpenes. Others are made from leaves with a similar but milder taste and fewer cannabinoids. There are also blends of the two, with some including other herbs or dried fruits to yield a unique aroma and effect. Make sure to always read the ingredient list to know what you’re buying!

One thing’s for sure: You definitely don’t have to worry about hemp tea getting you high. Even hemp flowers, which have the highest concentration of cannabinoids, only contain up to 0.2% THC. This isn’t enough to induce any effects, especially since even less of it will end up in your hot beverage.

HOW MUCH CBD IS IN HEMP TEA?

The amount of cannabinoids depends on the type of hemp tea you purchase. Since this is a largely unprocessed product, CBD will be present both as CBD and CBDA, its native form that turns into CBD over time or when it’s heated. Hemp leaf teas usually contain around 0.3-0.5% of CBD and CBDA combined, while flower teas contain around 3-5%. Besides the cannabinoids, all hemp teas are rich in antioxidants and beneficial terpenes.

Science tells us that if you prepare your tea with only water, around 25% of the CBD and 50% of the CBDA contained in the hemp will be dissolved into your brew. Nevertheless, there is lots of anecdotal evidence that teas prepared like this still have beneficial effects, probably due to the entourage effect [1]]. And if you wish to do so, adding a little fat while brewing your tea, coconut oil or heavy cream, for example, can help extract more cannabinoids.

HOW TO PREPARE HEMP TEA?

The official recommendation for brewing CBD tea is to add the hemp to cold water, bring it to a boil and leave it to boil for 15 minutes [1]. If that sounds too long and you don’t mind extracting a bit less of the cannabinoids or adding some fat, you can simply prepare your hemp tea the same way you would make any other tea. Add around one heaped teaspoon per cup, pour in your hot water, and let it steep for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on how flavorful you like your brew.

Do note that more isn’t better here. Studies have shown that the water in your cup quickly gets saturated with the soluble hemp components, so adding more tea could be a waste [2]. Once prepared, it’s best to drink your CBD tea while it’s fresh. It has been shown that storing it will lead to a steady decrease in the cannabinoid levels – around 60-70% going away even during the course of a single day [3]!

HERE’S THE TEA!

Like other herbal infusions, hemp tea can help you take time for yourself and enjoy a relaxing wellness ritual. As an added bonus, you get beneficial terpenes, antioxidants, and cannabinoids. What´s not to love? Try it after a long, stressful day, a workout, a yoga session, or while chilling with your friends.

We ensure our content is current and accurate with strict guidelines about sourcing that rely on governmental authority, academic institutions and peer-reviewed studies.

  • [1] Pacifici R, Marchei E, Salvatore F, Guandalini L, BusardC2 FP, Pichini S. Evaluation of cannabinoids concentration and stability in standardized preparations of cannabis tea and cannabis oil by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Clin Chem Lab Med. 2017 Aug 28;55(10):1555-1563. — Link to source
  • [2] Knezevic, Filip & Nikolai, Andreas & Marchart, Rudolf & Sosa, Silvio & Tubaro, Aurelia & Novak, Johannes. (2021). Residues of herbal hemp leaf teas b How much of the cannabinoids remain?. Food Control. 127. 108146. — Link to source
  • [3] Hazekamp A, Bastola K, Rashidi H, Bender J, Verpoorte R. Cannabis tea revisited: a systematic evaluation of the cannabinoid composition of cannabis tea. J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Aug 15;113(1):85-90. — Link to source
Portrait of Anna Falk

written by

anna falk - head of product

Anna Falk is Head of Product at Harmony. Anna obtained her PhD degree in Organic Chemistry with highest honours and has a combined 9 years of experience in R&D, project, and product management across the fields of natural product synthesis, catalysis, and cosmetics. She has produced award-winning, internationally published research at the Universities of Berkeley, Edinburgh, and Cologne.

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